top of page

Mindfulness and Depression

Updated: Aug 9, 2021

Complement to psychotherapy



Depression is now considered one of the main causes of disability worldwide, it is estimated that approximately 4.4% of the world population is affected by this condition. Symptoms can include mood swings, inability to feel pleasure or satisfaction, fatigue, feelings of incapacity, worthlessness or guilt, increased or decreased appetite and consequent weight changes, altered sleep patterns, physical agitation, and extreme suicidal thoughts . Aiming to enhance the results of conventional treatments, several alternatives have been suggested, with Mindfulness being one of the proposals whose researches demonstrate relevance with regard to depression, but not only.


With a greater number of scientific studies are the stress reduction programs based on Mindfulness or Mindfulness (MBSR), which develops the practice of mindfulness aimed at managing and reducing stress, and Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Both programs consist of sessions guided by a certified professional, and face-to-face sessions add practice that the person should carry out at home, in order to progressively integrate the contents into their daily lives.


Several studies link Mindfulness practice to improvements in self-regulation and subjective well-being. These results are verified in the long term (months), but also in the short term (4 days), having a positive impact on mood, on the ability to make decisions and reach goals, on the reduction of fatigue and anxiety, among others.


It is important to note that to benefit from the effects of Mindfulness in the long term and on a daily basis, the practice of meditation needs to be integrated, which means that it must be seen as an ongoing practice, not just one-off, contributing in its overall to a lifestyle change.




1. World Health Organization. Depression and other common mental disorders: global health estimates. Vol. 99. Geneva. (2017) p. 124–30. Retrieved from https://apps.who.int/.


2.Raes F, Dewulf D, Van Heeringen C, Williams JMG. Mindfulness and reduced cognitive reactivity to sad mood: Evidence from a correlational study and a non-randomized waiting list controlled study. Behav Res Ther (2009) 47(7):623–7. doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2009.03.007


3.Keng SL, Smoski MJ, Robins CJ. Effects of mindfulness on psychological health: A review of empirical studies. Clin Psychol Rev (2011) 31(6):1041–56. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2011.04.006 PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar


4.Zeidan F, Johnson SK, Diamond BJ, David Z, Goolkasian P. Mindfulness meditation improves cognition: Evidence of brief mental training. Conscious Cogn (2010a) 19(2):597–605. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2010.03.014 PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar


5.Manuello J, Vercelli U, Nani A, Costa T, Cauda F. Mindfulness meditation and consciousness: An integrative neuroscientific perspective. Conscious Cogn (2016) 40:67–87. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2015.12.005 PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar


6.Raes F, Dewulf D, Van Heeringen C, Williams JMG. Mindfulness and reduced cognitive reactivity to sad mood: Evidence from a correlational study and a non-randomized waiting list controlled study. Behav Res Ther (2009) 47(7):623–7. doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2009.03.007

Comments


bottom of page